At Modern Luxury, connection and community define who we are. We use cookies to improve the Modern Luxury experience - to personalize content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyze our traffic. We also may share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. We take your privacy seriously and want you to be aware that we have recently made changes to our Privacy Policy, which can be found here.

I AGREE
    

Explore the Renovated Historic Home of a Baseball Legend

By Michael McCarthy | February 26, 2021 | Home & Real Estate Migration

HALLS OF FAME


The team from Dogwood Interiors gutted this historic rowhouse and knocked down walls to create a more open floor plan PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROBERT RADIFERA
The team from Dogwood Interiors gutted this historic rowhouse and knocked down walls to create a more open floor plan.

A rowhouse, once owned by a baseball legend, is beautifully restored in the H Street Corridor.

Original timber joists were repurposed as shelving above the kitchen sink. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROBERT RADIFERA
Original timber joists were repurposed as shelving above the kitchen sink.

Mamie “Peanut” Johnson may have earned her legendary baseball status in Kansas City, but Washington is the town she held dear. Johnson, the first female pitcher to play in the Negro Leagues, was a lifelong DC resident. The late baseball player lived in a 2 ,550-square-foot rowhouse on 14th Street, which has been lovingly restored by Meredith and Shaw Mostashari, partners at Dogwood Interiors (dogwoodinteriorsdc.com). “Our goal was to make sure that whatever we did would make Mamie and her family proud,” says Shaw. “From researching and learning more about Mamie’s story and her contribution to baseball and society, it became clear that preserving and maintaining the property’s unique character and details—as well as maintaining her link to the community—was paramount.”


The home’s revitalized spaces deliver a relaxed, timeless aesthetic PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROBERT RADIFERA
The home’s revitalized spaces deliver a relaxed, timeless aesthetic.

While the three-level home, which features three bedrooms and two bathrooms, has exceptional bones, the Mostasharis knew they needed to reduce the property to its studs and subfloor before they could transform the space. “This way, we know what’s behind the walls,” says Shaw, whose team installed new electrical, plumbing, windows and HVAC. From there, the company’s design aesthetic—mixing DC’s rich architectural history with modern touches—began to take shape. “We enjoy mixing elements from all different eras, styles and periods. Whether the home is a Wardman style built in 1919 or a Victorian erected in 1898, restoring and preserving the historical integrity of these homes is truly meaningful,” he says.


Malibu engineered wide-plank flooring in French oak line all three levels of the rowhouse PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROBERT RADIFERA
Malibu engineered wide-plank flooring in French oak line all three levels of the rowhouse.

Since many older rowhouses have smaller rooms burdened by too many walls, Shaw says his team typically opens up spaces—especially main living areas—for entertaining. The restored Mamie Johnson property is a classic example of seamless f low between the living room, dining area and kitchen. They’re tied together with design elements like 7 ½ -inch Malibu (malibuwideplank.com) engineered wide-plank flooring in French oak. “We use engineered flooring to reduce the amount of cupping you traditionally see when using ¾-inch hardwood flooring,” says Shaw. “These floors also give the space the clean, fresh and more rustic feel we were going for in the home.”


The master bedroom is bathed in soft, neutral tones. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROBERT RADIFERA
The master bedroom is bathed in soft, neutral tones.

As a tip of the cap to t he baseball legend, Shaw says his team added a gorgeous design element in the kitchen. “We installed a stand-alone upper cabinet to signify the trailblazer Mamie was. We also repurposed 100-year-old joists from the home and used them as shelves above the kitchen sink—they’re truly unique.” Other original joists were used to construct shelving in high-traffic areas, including a fully restored basement. The rest of the historic property, including a master bedroom bathed in neutral tones, is a testament to craftsmanship. The home recently sold for nearly $1.4 million, “a price many agents and brokers thought was unattainable this far east of Capitol Hill,” says Shaw. Looks like Mamie Johnson’s magic continues to grace the town she adored.


The home’s lower level is geared for entertaining PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROBERT RADIFERA
The home’s lower level is geared for entertaining.



Photography by: Photos courtesy of Robert Radifera